Rutgers School of Environmental and Biological Sciences [Department of Plant Biology and Pathology]

Plant Biology & Pathology Course Synopsis

The following undergraduate courses are administered through or taught by faculty in the Deparment of Plant Biology & Pathology. For further information please contact the course instructor or the program coordinator.

Subject Areas

Available Environmental and Biological Sciences courses:

11:015:230 FUNDAMENTALS OF AGROECOLOGY(3)
Introduction to concepts of agroecology,including human interactions with the environment, agricultural plants, and animal-plant interactions.

11:015:257 TOPICS IN AGRICULTURE AND ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE: EDIBLE AND POINSONOUS MUSHROOMS (3)
An introduction to the fascinating hobby of mushroom hunting; recognition of common, easily identified edible, poisonous, and hallucinogenic mushrooms.  [Synopsis] [Syllabus]

11:015:408 JUNIOR/SENIOR COLLOQIUM: PLANTS AND HUMAN HEALTH (3)
Examination and critical analysis of alternative therapies currently used to treat human illnesses. [Syllabus]

11:015:423 JUNIOR/SENIOR COLLOQIUM: FUNGI: DIVERSITY, ECOLOGY, AND IMPACTS (3)
The diversity and ecology of fungal microbes, with emphasis on their economic, medical, agricultural and cultural impacts. [Synopsis] [Syllabus]

11:015:432 JUNIOR/SENIOR COLLOQIUM: PLANT-PEOPLE RELATIONSHIPS (3)
Investigation of the interaction of plants and people in natural and man-made settings. Topics include plants and human culture, plants and communities, plants and the human psycho-physiological response, horticultural therapy, and research and implementation. Students will collaborate on teams, delivering short reports and informal presentations. [Synopsis] [Syllabus]

11:015:439 JUNIOR/SENIOR COLLOQIUM: PESTICIDES: IMPACT ON HUMAN AND ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH (3)
This 3-credit colloquium aims at bringing to the fore the historical, current and future roles of pesticides in human life globally, the current status of their management in the developed and developing countries, mitigating the risks associated with their use and finding alternatives. The colloquium brings together world class experts in different areas of pesticide manufacture, handling, use, regulation and enforcement who will interact with students and share personal experiences that are germane to the understanding of the place for pesticides in human life now and in future. It is targeted at seniors and graduate students who are considering a future career in pesticide related disciplines. Class presentations on specified topics are key components of the colloquium. When feasible, students have an opportunity to visit sites that perform functions that relate to pesticide manufacture, handling, application, regulation, enforcement, etc. in the Mid-Atlantic.
[Synopsis] [Syllabus]

11:015:440 JUNIOR/SENIOR COLLOQIUM: AGROECOLOGY (3)
This course is designed to introduce various topics of Agroecology including traditional and organic farming, plant and animal production, energy, pest management, specialized and controlled environment agriculture and sustainable practices.  This is a colloquium and class size is small so we will try and have an interactive class environment. [Synopsis] [Syllabus]

11:015:442 JUNIOR/SENIOR COLLOQIUM: ENTREPRENURIAL AGRICULTURE (3)
Entrepreneurial Agriculture (EA) colloquium is a 3-credit course intended primarily to provide Rutgers’ students (junior, senior undergraduate and/or graduate) who have interest in Production Agriculture and Food (PA & F) with ingredients that are essential to engaging in or setting up of profitable and sustainable PA & F ventures in New Jersey and the Mid-Atlantic United States. Real life field experiences are emphasized and students are engaged in the practical development of their own virtual PA & F enterprise with simulated business and marketing plans. Students will present PA & F project plans to the class. At the end of colloquium the student should be able to develop a potentially bankable and viable small/medium scale PA & F enterprise capable of creating jobs and enhancing community development. The EA colloquium has three modules: Module1 Theoretical principles; Module II Practical applications; and Module III Student presentations. Successful completion of the three modules earns the student three (3) credits. [Synopsis] [Syllabus]

11:015:492 TROPICAL AGRICULTURE (3)
This is a University-wide Junior/Senior Colloquium and an Agricultural and Plant Science Elective. .It is an experiential learning and highly interactive course.  It uses a holistic systems approach to evaluate and understand agricultural and environmental issues in the tropical world. Students are able to compare and contrast the tropical and temperate agricultural systems. Rutgers faculty and non-Rutgers personnel with experience in tropical agricultural systems are invited to give lectures on topical issues affecting agriculture in the tropics.  Teams of students are formed to learn about the agricultural systems of selected tropical countries or regions.and give a class presentation based on their understanding of how  the agricultural system works in the chosen country or region. [Synopsis] [Syllabus]
Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.

11:015:494 TROPICAL AGRICULTURE AND NATURAL RESOURCES FIELD STUDY (3)
An intensive, 10-day field experience in a tropical country; visits to and analyses of tropical agricultural production and natural resource systems.
Lec. 55 min. Field experience during spring break. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.

11:015:495 TROPICAL AGRICULTURE AND NATURAL RESOURCES INTERNSHIP (BA)
Supervised research experience in a tropical environment, working with scientists in crop production, aquaculture, and forest management. Offered in Puerto Rico for at least six weeks during the summer. [Synopsis]
Prerequisite: Open to juniors with permission of instructor.

 

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Available Plant Science courses:

11:776:170 PLANTS AND PEOPLE (3)
The influence of plants on the economic, social, and cultural history of man, especially as sources of food, shelter, clothing, drugs, and industrial raw materials. Current problems of agriculture, plant industry, medicine, and conservation. (Formerly 01:119:170) [Synopsis] [Syllabus]

11:776:200 MODERN CROP PRODUCTION (3)
Introduction to agronomic crops and their relationship to the environment; importance, classification, production practices and problems, and utilization. [Synopsis] [Syllabus]

11:776:202 APPLIED PHYSIOLOGY OF HORTICULTURAL CROPS (3)
The physiology of plants and regulation of their growth. Emphasis on the environmental and developmental aspects of plant physiology that allow plants to survive, grow, and reproduce despite transient and seasonal periods of environmental stress. [Synopsis]
Prerequisite: 01:119:101, 01:119:115-116 or permission of instructor.

11:776:205 INTRODUCTION TO ETHNOBOTANY (3)
Broad overview of the science of ethnobotany (how people use plants), with emphasis on current research and issues. [Synopsis] [Syllabus]
Pre- or corequisite: 01:119:102, 01:119:115-116, or 103.

11:776:210 PRINCIPLES OF BOTANY (4)
Structure, function, diversity, reproduction, and evolution in the plant kingdom. (Formerly 01:119:210) Lec. 3 hrs., lab. 3 hrs. [Synopsis] [Syllabus]
Prerequisites: 01:119:101-102 or 01:119:115-116. Credit not given for both this course and 11:776:242.

11:776:211 INTRODUCTION TO HORTICULTURE (3)
The art and science of horticulture: its historical impact, biology, technology, and industry. Laboratory exercises applying horticultural techniques to growing plants. Lab fee. Lec. 2 hrs., lab. 3 hrs. [Synopsis] [Syllabus]
Pre- or corequisite: 01:119:101 or 01:119:115.

11:776:221 PRINCIPLES OF ORGANIC CROP PRODUCTION (3)
Cultural management practices that form the basis for organic crop production: soil stewardship, plant health, and avoiding competition without synthetic chemicals. Implementation of cropping techniques and emerging technologies. [Synopsis]
Prerequisites: 01:119:101-102 or 01:119:115-116.

11:776:225 INTRODUCTION TO HORTICULTURE THERAPY (3)
Brief history of the practice of horticulture therapy and the special needs populations it benefits. Adaptations and modifications enabling individuals to participate. Professional requirements. [Synopsis] [Syllabus]

11:776:230 FUNDAMENTALS OF AGROECOLOGY (3)
The ecological principles and processes that operate in sustainable plant and animal agricultural systems.  [Syllabus]

11:776:231 COMMERCIAL FLORAL DESIGN (3)
Fundamentals of commercial floral design theory, applied in laboratory sessions. Demonstrations and practice in the development of proper handling techniques and design skills for a variety of occasions, with emphasis on creativity, salability, and vase life.

11:776:232 RETAIL FLOWER SHOP MANAGEMENT (3)
Operation and management of the retail florist business. Application of principles of postharvest physiology. Experience in merchandising and the operation of the college florist shop. Lec. and lab. Prerequisite: 11:776:231.

11:776:242 PLANT SCIENCE (3)
Fundamentals of structure, taxonomy, growth and development, metabolism, reproduction, and ecology of plants. Dynamics, manipulation, biotechnology, and the development of new characteristics in plants. Lec. 2 hrs., lab. 3 hrs.[Synopsis] [Syllabus]
Prerequisite: 01:119:101 or 01:119:115. Credit not given for both this course and 11:776:210.

11:776:301 GRAIN CROPS(3)
Grain crops defined; US & global significance; utilization options (food, feed, bioenergy); production and management principles; crop improvement options; postharvest handling; international trade; global employment opportunities. [Synopsis] [Syllabus]
Prerequisites: 01:119:115 General Biology or equivalent

11:776:302 GENERAL PLANT PATHOLOGY (3)
The occurrence, economic importance, symptoms, causes, and control of plant diseases.[Synopsis] [Syllabus]
Prerequisites: 01:119:101-102 or 01:119:115-116.

11:776:304 TURFGRASS MANAGEMENT (4)
Growth, development, adaptation, and selection of the major turfgrass species. Principles of establishment, mowing, nutrition, irrigation, and pest control of home lawn, athletic field, golf, and utility turfs. Two 80-min. lecs., lab. 3 hrs.[Synopsis] [Syllabus]

11:776:305 PLANT GENETICS (4)
Heritable variation, strategies, and consequences of sexual/asexual reproduction, inbreeding and outbreeding. Chromosome structure, behavior, and mapping. Uses of tissue culture and recombinant DNA techniques in plant genetic manipulation. Two 80-min. lecs., lab. 3 hrs.
Prerequisites: 01:119:101-102 or 01:119:115-116.

11:776:310 PLANT PROPAGATION (3) Theory and practice of multiplying plants by seeds and vegetative means such as cuttings, grafts, buds, and layers. Lec./rec. 2 hrs., lab. 3 hrs. [Synopsis] [Syllabus]
Prerequisite: 11:776:210 or 211 or 242 or permission of instructor.

11:776:311 GENERAL PLANT PATHOLOGY LABORATORY (1) An optional laboratory course utilizing specific techniques and plant diseases to illustrate the basic principles of plant pathology. [Synopsis] [Syllabus]
Pre- or corequisite: 11:770:302.

11:776:312 MEDICINAL PLANTS (3)
Use of plants for medicinal and other purposes; poisonous plants; cross-cultural aspects; chemistry and biological significance of natural products; natural products from higher plants in modern medicine. [Syllabus]

11:776:321 GREENHOUSE MANAGEMENT AND CROP PRODUCTION (3)
The greenhouse environment, its manipulation and control in the production of florist plants. Principles of production of major cut-flower and plant crops. Lec. 2 hrs., lab. 3 hrs.

11:776:325 HORTICULTURE THERAPY TECHNIQUES AND PROGRAMMING (3)
Use of adaptive devices and enabling tools. Methodologies for program evaluation and for documentation of program effectiveness. [Synopsis] [Syllabus]
Prerequisite: 11:776:225.

11:776:330 CONSERVATION VEGETATION (3)
History and theory of vegetative covers and their use in various climates. Environmental significance of defoliation, pollution involvement, and techniques of establishment and maintenance.
Prerequisite: 11:776:200 or permission of instructor.

11:776:340 PRINCIPLES AND PRACTICES OF FRUIT PRODUCTION (4)
The culture of tree fruits, including orchard establishment, nutrition, pest control, pruning, fruit development, variety and rootstock selection, and growth regulators. Field trip fee. Lec. 2 hrs., rec. 3 hrs., lab. 3 hrs.
Prerequisite: 11:776:211.

11:776:341 FRUIT PRODUCTION (3)
The growing of small fruits and grapes. Varieties, fruit-growing systems, and harvesting methods involved in grapes, strawberries, blueberries, brambles, and cranberries. [Synopsis]
Prerequisite: 11:776:210 or 211 or permission of instructor.

11:776:350 AGROECOLOGY PRACTICUM (3)
The student gains a wide range of practical experience covering all facets of sustainable/organic greenhouse, high tunnel and field production of horticultural crops.  A minimum of 3 hours per week at the Student Sustainable Farm site about a mile from Cook campus is required. [Synopsis]

11:776:382 PLANT PHYSIOLOGY (4)
Water relations, photosynthesis, inorganic nutrition, metabolism of organic materials, and plant growth regulation. Emphasis on environmental factors in the physiology of plants. Lec./rec. 3 hrs., lab. 3 hrs. [Synopsis} [Syllabus]
Prerequisites: 01:119:101-102 or 01:119:115-116, 11:776:210 or 242. Recommended: Organic chemistry.

11:776:389 APPLICATIONS OF IRRIGATION, MATH, AND EQUIPMENT TECHNOLOGY IN THE TURFGRASS INDUSTRY (2)
This is an applied course designed for those interested in turf and landscape management. The course covers irrigation design, installation and maintenance, mower technology, and mathematics applications for the management of golf, sports, and landscape areas that are not preesented extensively in other courses at the University. Lectures, hands-on demonstrations, interactive discussions, and case study projects are used to teach the fundamentals of turfgrass science. The focus of this course is on critical thinking rather than passive learning to solve real world problems commonly confronted by the turf and landscape manager in the field. [Synopsis] [Syllabus]
Prerequisites: 11:776:304 or permission of instructor.

11:776:391 DISEASES AND INSECTS OF ORNAMENTAL PLANTS (3)
The pathological and environmentally induced diseases of urban, shade, and forest trees. Lectures, laboratory demonstrations, and field trips to acquaint students with the primary diseases of shade and forest trees. [Synopsis] [Syllabus]
Prerequisite: 11:770:301.

11:776:400 MYCOLOGY: FUNGI IN THE ENVIRONMENT (3)
Identification, ecology, and biodiversity of fungi. Laboratory includes sampling techniques, identification and descriptive procedures, culture collections, mycological herbaria, and field trips. [Synopsis] [Syllabus]
Prerequisites: 01:119:101-102 or 01:119:115-116.

11:776:401 POSTHARVEST PHYSIOLOGY OF HORTICULTURAL CROPS (3)
A study of metabolic processes including aging and stress phenomena in harvested horticultural crops. Postharvest preservation concepts and technologies, food crops, distribution, and marketing.
Prerequisite: A course in plant physiology or plant physiology background or permission of instructor.

11:776:402 WEEDS: IMPACT AND MANAGEMENT IN RURAL AND URBAN LANDSCAPES (3)
Weed identification and the fundamentals of weed ecology and biology as they relate to management strategies. Emphasis on nonchemical methods as well as herbicide chemistry. Topics include invasive weed species and the impact of plant biotechnology on weed control. [Synopsis] [Syllabus]

11:776:404 SOIL MANAGEMENT FOR SPORTS AND LANDSCAPE APPLICATIONS (3)
Principles of turf soil science and management. Managing soils for plant nutrition, manipulation for water supply and drainage, efficient irrigation, and use of poor quality water. Lecture, field experience, field trips. [Synopsis] [Syllabus]
Prerequisite: 11:375:102 or 360.

11:776:405 PLANT BIOSECURITY ISSUES AND TECHNOLOGIES (3)
Plant health policies and regulations safeguarding agriculture and environmental resources.  Biosecurity technologies for plant pest monitoring and detection. [Synopsis] [Syllabus]
Prerequisites: 01:119:115 & 01:119:116

11:776:406 PLANT BREEDING (3)
History, theory, and practice of plant breeding. [Synopsis] [Syllabus]
Prerequisite: 01:447:380 or 11:776:305.

11:776:408 TURFGRASS PEST SCIENCE (4)
Biology, etiology, and management of major turfgrass pests, including fungal, bacterial, and viral pathogens; insects, nematodes, vertebrates, and weeds. Includes a laboratory in diagnostics. [Synopsis] [Syllabus]
Prerequisites: 01:119:101-102, 01:119:115-116, or 103; 11:776:238 or 304 or permission.

11:776:410 PLANTS FOR BIOENERGY(3)
This course will introduce the topic of bioenergy and discuss various renewable energy sources from biomass.  Agronomic and bioenergy traits will be discussed for each biomass source.  Conversion technologies from different biomass sources will also be discussed. [Synopsis] [Syllabus]

11:776:413 SOIL QUALITY (3)
Introduces the concept of soil quality and elaborates on the soil properties that affect the ability of soils to function in the environment. These soil properties most important to society for ecosystem processes will be examined, and soil types will be compared with regard to their relative capability to serve different roles. Degradation of our soil resource and restoration of desirable properties will be addressed; management to maintain or improve soil quality and maximize ecosystem sustainability will be emphasized. [Synopsis] [Syllabus]
Prerequisites: . 11:375:360 Soils & Water or equivalent; 01:119:101-102 or 01:119:115-116, General Biology

11:776:421 VEGETABLE PRODUCTION AND MARKETING (3)
Significance of vegetable crops to the US economy, production principles, post harvest handling, environmental impact, emerging vegetable crops in changing US demographics, vegetable crop marketing, and global job opportunities in the vegetable crops industry. [Synopsis] [Syllabus]

11:776:425 SPECIAL TOPICS IN HORTICULTURE THERAPY (2)
Independent research in the area of people-plant relationships. Several formal class meetings at the beginning and conclusion of the project. [Synopsis]
Prerequisite: 11:776:325 or permission of instructor.

11:776:439 NURSERY CROP PRODUCTION (3)
Principles, practices, and production of temperate-zone woody ornamental plants. Both field and container growing considered. [Syllabus]
Prerequisites: 11:776:211 or equivalent and a course in plant materials.

11:776:440 SOIL FERTILITY (3)
Soil-plant relationships in the field and laboratory methods of diagnosing nutrient deficiencies in soils and plants. [Synopsis] [Syllabus]
Prerequisite: 11:375:266 or permission of instructor. 11:776:450

11:776:443 INTERNATIONAL AGRICULTURE: NEW CROPS AND NEW USES (3)
Core course for International Science and Education at Rutgers’ SEBS. Colloquium discusses new crops and new uses for food and biofuels, cultural perspectives, adaptations and production potential in NJ and the Mid-Atlantic. Student presentation focuses on international crops that may be adapted to NJ & the Mid-Atlantic for food and/or biofuels. [Synopsis] [Syllabus]
Prerequisite: None but a background in Plant Science/Agricultural Science/Environmental Science/Natural Resources is recommended.

11:776:450 HORTICULTURAL TOPICS (2)
Conferences with growers, marketers, and other business representatives to learn opinions, insights, and experiences related to their specific fields of horticulture.
Prerequisite: 11:776:211. Open only to juniors and seniors.

11:776:451 FINE AND SPORTS TURF (3)
Grass identification and selection, the diagnosis and treatment of disease and pests, fertilizer and weed control programs, irrigation, drainage, thatch control, and maintenance. [Synopsis] [Syllabus]
Prerequisites: 11:375:266; 11:776:200, 304, 402, and 452, or permission of instructor.

11:704:468 CHINA'S ECOLOGICAL, AGRICULTURAL & ENVIRONMENTAL CHALLENGES AND GLOBAL IMPACTS (3)
This course will focus on major environmental and ecological issues in China in the past decades, such as pollutions, soil erosion, deforestation/reforestation, desertification and urbanization, as well as strategies to deal with the challenges. Driving forces, such as population pressure, economic growth, globalization, climate change and socio-politicial factors, will be examined through lectures and projects. The course will also introduce the growing opportunities (eg. business, private industry, academia and government agents) in environment and conservation areas. [Synopsis] [Syllabus]

11:776:495,496 SPECIAL PROBLEMS IN PLANT SCIENCE (BA,BA)
Projects in plant science with assigned reading, laboratory work, and conferences. Prerequisites: Permission of instructor and special problems adviser.

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